WHO WE ARE:

WE are:
FEMALE-led.
impact-FOCUSED.
DESIGN-DRIVEN.

MEET OUR FOUNDER:

HOLLY BUDGE

Holly Budge will inspire you to think big. She's an adventurer, Everest summiteer and the first woman to skydive Everest. For her impactful work in the non-profit arena, she's been voted 'Woman of the Year' for 2023/24 and has received praise from Sir David Attenborough. As an international speaker on conservation, sustainability and adventure, she was described as “down-to-earth and incredibly inspiring” by HRH Prince Edward. Holly has fundraised over £500,000 for environmental and social projects. She's a passionate advocate for female rangers globally.

OUR BEGINNING

WE MAKE DATA VISUAL

At How Many Elephants, we make complex data visual to educate and inspire a global audience about the devastating impacts of the African Elephant ivory trade. Check out our multi award-winning ‘96 Elephants A Day’ Necklace. This striking necklace displays 96 elephants to show the daily poaching rate in Africa. Made from vegetable ivory, a sustainable plant material from the Amazon Rainforest, which is almost identical in colour and texture to elephant ivory. A narrative has been weaved in, with one elephant hand cut in brass to represent one day and one elephant is facing the other way to represent hope.

OUR DIFFERENCE

WE ARE 100%
NON-GORY

Picture 35,000 elephants on a wall. This is the current annual poaching rate in Africa. Shocking, eh? Our hard hitting exhibition displays this data visually. Part of the originality of our design-led campaign is in our approach to avoid gruesome and shocking imagery to portray the facts. It’s not about scaring people, it’s about sharing the sheer scale of the poaching crisis. To actually see and connect with this data visually is highly impactful. Our exhibition has travelled round the world educating thousands of people about the impacts of the elephant ivory trade.

OUR FOCUS

WE SUPPORT FEMALE RANGERS

At How Many Elephants, we have seen first-hand the significant ripple effect of investing in women and that bringing gender equity into the ranger workforce is strengthening community conservation efforts and relationships, with women being natural communicators, educators and investing their earned income in their families. Rangers are the last line of defence in protecting wildlife and wild spaces. Day and night, they patrol vast wilderness areas, monitor wildlife, seize snares, work with communities and, in some cases, arrest poachers. The female ranger movement is gaining momentum across Africa and around the world, as women are proving so successful in using the power of conversation to ease local tension and strengthen connections between conservation and community.

GET INVOLVED:

MAKE A DONATION

We need to act now if we want future generations to see African elephants in the wild. 100% of your donation will help to train, equip and support rangers who risk their lives daily to protect precious ecosystems.

Credit: Amish Chhagan