World Female Ranger Day

Hot Off The Press:

We’re launching World Female Ranger Day on June 23 2021

This ground-breaking global awareness day will celebrate and support female anti-poaching rangers, spotlighting Africa in its first year

World Female Ranger Day will allow female anti-poaching rangers across the globe to come together, to access peer support, to offer and receive advice, and to share their stories so that they can continue to do their important work. We’re building a platform that enables female anti-poaching rangers across the world to come together, access peer support, offer and receive advice, and share their stories. This will be launched in the coming weeks. #worldfemalerangerday

Sneak peek

Meet some of the African women who are giving their all to protect wildlife from extinction. As you’re reading this, these brave female rangers out there in the field, seizing snares, clearing out poachers’ camps, and patrolling vast wilderness areas – with Africa’s wildlife being decimated by poaching and habitat loss, the jobs of wildlife rangers is paramount right now.

Meet Nyaradzo Hoto (29)

A ranger from the Akashinga Anti-Poaching Unit in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo was forced to drop out of school and ended up in an abusive marriage. She joined Akashinga in 2017, thanks to her grit and tenacity. She is currently studying Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the Chinhoyi University of Technology, and her regular income has allowed her to purchase land and build a house.

She is a strong role model for women in her community and around the world. She says, “women are the face of the future. They are the face of conservation because of their heart.”

Meet Nyaradzo Hoto (29)

A ranger from the Akashinga Anti-Poaching Unit in Zimbabwe, Nyaradzo was forced to drop out of school and ended up in an abusive marriage. She joined Akashinga in 2017, thanks to her grit and tenacity. She is currently studying Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the Chinhoyi University of Technology, and her regular income has allowed her to purchase land and build a house.

She is a strong role model for women in her community and around the world. She says, “women are the face of the future. They are the face of conservation because of their heart.”

Meet Leitah Mkhabela (28)

A ranger from the Black Mamba Anti-Poaching Unit in South Africa, Leitah says we cannot do it by ourselves. We need more eyes, more people helping us. When I started as a Black Mamba, people were scared of the training we went through.”

“People said this training is for men and we couldn’t do it because we are women. The hardest part was that even women were looking down on us. But people started to come around once the impact of the female rangers was clear. It has helped women in the community to see themselves differently. People have seen how we want to do this and so many women started to support us.”

Meet Leitah Mkhabela (28)

A ranger from the Black Mamba Anti-Poaching Unit in South Africa, Leitah says we cannot do it by ourselves. We need more eyes, more people helping us. When I started as a Black Mamba, people were scared of the training we went through.”

“People said this training is for men and we couldn’t do it because we are women. The hardest part was that even women were looking down on us. But people started to come around once the impact of the female rangers was clear. It has helped women in the community to see themselves differently. People have seen how we want to do this and so many women started to support us.”

Meet Sithabile Munenge (33)

A Community Scout (Ranger) for National Park Rescue in Zimbabwe used to sell tomatoes on a dusty roadside to make money to feed her children.

She says it wasn’t enough to look after them. Usually, men are the first preference to be employed by companies. But now I have the respect of my community, and I will be able to build my children’s future.” 

Meet Sithabile Munenge (33)

A Community Scout (Ranger) for National Park Rescue in Zimbabwe used to sell tomatoes on a dusty roadside to make money to feed her children.

She says it wasn’t enough to look after them. Usually, men are the first preference to be employed by companies. But now I have the respect of my community, and I will be able to build my children’s future.” 

Hear stories directly from the female rangers here.